The horse–human dyad: Can we align horse training and handling activities with the equid social ethogram?

McGreevy, P.D., Burton, F.L., McLean, A.N., 2009. The horse–human dyad: Can we align horse training and handling activities with the equid social ethogram? The Veterinary Journal. 181 (2009) 12–18. Abstract This article examines the recently completed equid ethogram and shows how analogues of social interactions between horses may occur in various human–horse interactions. It discusses…

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The distribution of apparatus in popular equestrian disciplines.

Hill, E., McGreevy, P.D., White, P., Caspar, G., McLean, A.N., 2015. The distribution of apparatus in popular equestrian disciplines. Journal of Veterinary Behavior, 10. 147-152. Abstract The apparatus that riders use to restrain or communicate with horses have progressed over time. With the increased awareness of animal welfare, the use of some of these devices…

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The Contribution of Equitation Science to Minimising Horse-Related Risks to Humans

Melissa Starling,1,* Andrew McLean,2,† and  Paul McGreevy1,† Kirrilly Thompson, Academic Editor Simple Summary Equitation science describes an approach to horse training and riding that focuses on embracing the cognitive abilities of horses, their natural behaviour, and how human riders can use signalling and rewards to best effect. This approach is concerned with both horse welfare and rider safety, and…

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The 10 Principles of Training

The following 10 training principles are presented as ‘First Principles’ for all horse training interactions. As first Principles, these stand as non-negotiable obligations for trainers to maintain optimal welfare in trained horses as well as optimal training efficiency. These Principles are presented as further refinements of the original 10 Principles on the ISES website and in peer-reviewed literature…

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Stop Arguing! How to correct conflict behaviours through training – Hazel Plumbley, Horse Sport Magazine

First appeared in the November 2016 issue of Horse Sport, written by Hazel Plumbley At a recent clinic in BC, experienced coaches and veterinarians gave Andrew and Manuela McLean a list of conflict behaviours seen most frequently in horses they received for training, being ridden by students, or treated in their practice. Top issues were reluctance to ‘go,’ contact issues, tension, crookedness, bolting, rearing, and spooking. Here are their step-by-step…

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